Software Developer Drought: Where are you in Demand?

With an increasing need for software by non-tech companies, a developer drought is growing outside of Silicon Valley.

Turns out there’s a major need for software developers outside of the traditional geo-center of Silicon Valley. Despite COVID-19, states in the US heartland are actively hiring developers. Plus, professionals on the West Coast are reassessing work-life opportunities and exploring start-up prospects outside the Valley and other tech hotspots.

This isn’t a shift to remote workers. In July and August, 92% of software developer job ads on three leading employment sites were for work-on-premises jobs. Apparently, employers are slow to embrace remote working.

The data comes from Mendix, a Siemens business involved in low-code application development. The company recently launched the Mendix 2020 Software Developer Drought Index, an effort to track hiring shortages for developers on the US county and state levels. click here for full article . . .

LAEDC 8-24-20 Economic Update for Los Angeles County, unemployment, industries and housing

In this LAEDC economic analysis webinar, Shannon Sedgwick, director of LAEDC’s Institute for Applied Economics offers perspective and analysis of the latest labor market and jobs data from California EDD, published 8-21-20. In addition LAEDC economist Tyler Laferriere discusses housing prices and the stock and bond market relative to the economic recession. LAEDC CEO Bill Allen introduces the speakers and provides an overview.

AFL-CIO To Host Labor Web Conferences Friday-Monday Of Labor Day Week-End

Join AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka for a conversation with union members who are serving on the front lines as we battle COVID-19. From teaching our kids to caring for the sick to serving our communities, these workers will share their personal journeys and discuss why we need to pass the HEROES Act to protect and support those on the job.

LABOR LIVE: FRONT-LINE WORKERS AND COVID-19 – Friday Sept 4, 3pm PT

LABOR LIVE: THE ONGOING ECONOMIC FALLOUT OF COVID-19 – Sat. Sept 5 9am PT

LABOR LIVE: PROTECTING THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE AND VOTE BY MAIL Sunday Sept 6 3pm PT

LABOR DAY LIVE: A CONVERSATION WITH VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN, Monday, Sept 7, 1:15p PT

Click Here to go to Labor Day Live

Which platform makes sense for your e-commerce business?

NEW Women’s Business Center offers this webinar. They will go over the platforms available and what is the difference among them. Will cover all the main e-commerce platforms: Shopify, BigCommerce, Volusion, MagentoGo, Yahoo Small Business, Yola and ebay.

The NEW Women’s Business Center provides resources and tools to ensure women entrepreneurs are on the right track for economic independence through small business ownership.

Register here with Women’s Business Center – for this FREE online workshop. August 27, 2020 from 4pm to 6pm.

LA Veterans Collaborative Zoom Meeting Aug. 12, 2020

Don’t forget to register for the Los Angeles Veterans Collaborative (LAVC) meeting on Wednesday, August 12, 2020. This meeting will take place on Zoom – from 9am to 12pm.

 
This month we will hear from Dr. Carl Castro, Director of the USC Military and Veterans Programs (MVP).  He will discuss the future of the LAVC and the ongoing collective effort in securing its longevity.  Also, Jim Zenner, Mental Health Clinical Program Manager, with the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health, will provide an update on the Veteran Peer Access Network (VPAN). Kelly Armaly, Consultant, with the Southern California Grantmakers (SCG), will share SCG/ VPAN Request for Proposal (RFP) opportunities at the local level.  Tony Madril, LCSW, will share information about an ongoing pilot study examining the benefits of Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapyin the treatment of PTSD. 
The Legal and Re-Entry workgroup will host Rigo Reyes from the Los Angeles County Consumer & Business Affairs Department. His presentation will start at 11 am immediately following the collective meeting. 

Register Here

LA Covid-19 Community Connectory

Due to COVID-19, employers and workers in our region are facing challenges of epic proportions.

During these unprecedented times, the LAEDC has established this LA Covid-19 Community Connectory which seeks to provide crucial resources for vulnerable residents, small businesses, and nonprofits. The Community Connectory:

  • Engages LAEDC’s award-winning staff of business assistance and layoff avoidance professionals to directly help employers overcome challenges, retain staff and position for economic recovery.
  • Spotlights a growing array of financial resources that directly support individuals, as well as programs to help businesses and community-based organizations.
  • Provides frequent analysis and economic outlooks from LAEDC’s Institute for Applied Economics to help all people in our region plan for economic recovery.

All the services of LA Community Connectory are provided at no charge, in keeping with LAEDC’s public-benefit mission, and true to our history of helping save over 240,000 direct jobs in LA County over the past 20 years.

Click here to go to site for more information and to register for services

When Women Vote: A Zócalo/Natural History Museum of LA Online Event – Aug 20, 2020 6pm

One hundred years after the passage of the 19th Amendment, Zócalo and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County present When Women Vote, a three-event series that begins with “How Have Women’s Protests Changed History?” 

There are few forces of nature more formidable than a group of women fed up with the status quo. From the French Revolution—which was sparked in part by a 7,000-woman march from Paris to Versailles—to Black Lives Matter—which was founded by three women—some of the most important protest movements in global history have been women-led. In addition to organizing many of summer 2020’s continuing marches, over the past century women have taken to the streets to rally for voting and equal rights, to condemn sexual and gun violence, and to stand against the sitting president. But protest has taken other forms too, including the #MeToo movement, anti-colonial mobilizations from Ethiopia to Southeast Asia, women taking the wheel in Saudi Arabia to demand the right to drive, and boycotts and strikes like the Women’s Political Council Montgomery bus boycott. How have women risen up collectively to create change—and influenced broader movements in the process? What has made women particularly effective protesters, and what ideas have women come up with that have changed the art of protest? A panel of scholars and activists visits Zócalo and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County to discuss the power of women saying “no” throughout history.

Register here